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20130117
20130117
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
a hoot. let's talk about the debt ceiling debate. we are all focused on this week and the president has been talking about it. what is your view on whether spending cuts should be part of the debt ceiling debate? i think that would be a serious mistake. i'm a republican, i have been so since i voted for ike in 1962 and let me tell you ie mistake. you are not talking about one thing that has to do with cutting spending. you're talking about everything and he paying your debts of the guys in the congress talk about an republican republicans drama. and every one of them has something to do with wanting ... and now you have to pay it. and you better pay and where your country is clearly facing a dire consequences. it shows that you don't give a whit about who's president. >> do you agree with the president and you think that we are risking what? a selloff in the market? 2001. >> what's going to happen if it comes to the worst case scenario here? >> somebody will say, don't forget, we all $16.4 trillion. half of that is owned by private people like your mother or somebody in the city hall or
. it's not happening. neil: the test will be the debt ceiling fight. >> you're right. neil: four to five weeks out, the exsense of the sequestering cuts, and what they do with that, but i don't see anything encouraging in republicans' behavior leading me to believe they'll risk another fight with the president. >> i disagree. we're in a stronger position. missing call cliff, if nothing happens, president obama and the democrats got a tax hike. you know, inertia was against us at that point, but nos -- now it's a fight of more spending, and we're not about to give that to them. they need signing off on the -- neil: we'll see. i mean, republicans kind of folded like cheap suits on that. i don't care on the left or right, where you are, but it was 40-1 tax hikes over spending cuts. what balances that? 20-1? >> it was not enough -- it's -- i disagree that the bottom 98% of the income distribution is getting over taxed. they are getting complex tax. there's a lot of work to get the rate down to nothing. neil: you're for screwing us more? >> simple higher level without -- neil: there y
to sit in a pot of water waiting for it to boil. >> stop using the debt ceiling. you'll have a continuing resolution that runs out two weeks afterwards. why risk. in fact, if this is the rhetorical debate you want to have -- >> the problem with the republican party we get into this incrementalism where we assume we can win and keep putting off the debate. let's have a debate about whether or not we should balance our budget. >> a continuing resolution will be passed. the debt ceiling will be raised, right. >> i agree. the debt limit should be raised. >> should be raised with spending cuts and policy changes. >> why. >> so we can put our nation on a path to balance. >> why not have the fight on resolution. you're talking about future spending and not threatening the full faith and credit of the u.s. government. >> nobody is threatening the full faith and credit. >> it undermines your argument to have it during the debt ceiling debate. >> we can have this debate right now. we need it for the next month and come together a month from now and figure out where we stand. to prejudge this debate
to the president, "hey, you know, on this debt ceiling stuff, we ought to do something big." >> narrator: on and off for weeks, obama and boehner met in secret. >> boehner calls these "the nicorettes and merlot sessions." the president is having iced tea and chewing a nicorette. and boehner is having a glass of merlot red wine and smoking a cigarette. >> narrator: it was obama's dream negotiation. a bipartisan deal. >> if the speaker and the president could come to a deal, and they both, as we used to say, hold hands and kind of jump off the ledge together, then they could not ram through, but they surely, with the strength of their positions, would have a very good chance to sell them the package. >> narrator: the president offered entitlement cuts. the speaker offered increased revenue from taxes. with less than two weeks to go, they thought they had a deal. it became known as the grand bargain. >> it's not every day that the speaker comes to see the president quietly and says, "i'm willing to do a deal" that everybody knows is going to be dangerous for him politically. >> narrator: ba
this week. on monday he warned republicans to not even think of using the debt ceiling as bargaining leverage. let's listen to him. >> but they will not collect or ransom in exchange for not crashing the american economy. the financial well-being of the american people is not leverage to be used. the full faith and credit of the united states of america is not at bargaining chip. >> on tuesday following a meeting that took place in the west wing, president obama surmounted a huge hurdle in the nomination of chuck hagel to be defense secretary when influential new york senator chuck schumer gave it his blessing. yesterday the president forcefully and emotionally laid out his proposals to curb gun violence and challenged americans to confront the representatives and stand up to the nra. let's listen. >> ask them what's more important, doing whatever it takes to get an "a" grade from the gun lobby that funds their campaigns or giving parents some peace of mind when they drop their child off for first grade. >> joining me is former rnc chair and machines contributor michael steele and de
the government running. they only have about 4-6 weeks left before the nation hits the national debt ceiling. republicans are calling for budge cuts in return for raising the debt ceiling, but president obama came out swinging during his news conference on monday claiming he's already gone a long way toward closing the budget gap. joining us now to fact check some of his statements, stephen hayes, a senior writer for the weekly standard and a fox news contributor, douglas holtz-eakin is now president of the american action forum. just as a general rule, steven, when you heard the president speaking in that news conference, was he generally being honest with the american people about the state of our finances? >> well, i would say there were some things he said that were true, some things that he said that were, i think, misleading. importantly, he didn't put into proper context the discussion that we're having nationally about the debt ceiling and about the state of our finances more broadly. if you look at where we are, more than $16 trillion in debt, the president is right when he says tha
first days and weeks and months in office? >> gretchen: i have to say, in the last debt ceiling press conference, at least when a question came up about that, the president was i think taken aback. there were a couple tough questions with regard to that particular topic the other day. you think that's more of an anomaly. >> of course. it still is. and the fact that it is so noteworthy and news worthy, i think, reflects poorly on the press. it is true that there are a few very good reporters out there in the white house press corp., nonfox ones, that have been pursuing stories, and we know what happens. they get punished and get yelled at behind the scenes. the sense of jadedness that the president has with them, the thin skinnedness with which he treats them, i think this speaks of a very dysfunctional relationship. >> brian: michelle, it was major garrett. he did something that ed henry also does, follow up question. the question hates the follow-up question because if he gets a tough question, he gives long answers. you almost forget the question. what do you is you jump right back
and comprehensive, and that's one of them. >> very last thing, on the debt ceiling. republicans like pat toomey have suggested that you should prioritize what debts you pay off so that things like social security get paid -- payments. as the president said in his press conference last week, he wants them to be paid; wants to make sure people don't lose their benefits. why not prioritize those payments? i just want to give you a chance to respond to the republican plan that's out there. >> sure. well, there's not a specific plan; there's somebody talking about it. but let's be real here. there is no off-ramp. there is no way to mitigate the horrific economic consequences of default. choosing whether you pay social security beneficiaries or combat troops in afghanistan, or veterans who depend on the va for benefits, or bondholders -- these are choices that are about default. and the fact is default is not an acceptable option here. congress has to simply do its job and pay the bills that they've already racked up, meet the obligations that they have already made. and then we continue to debate how we
is trading like the market should off the things that matter to the market. the debt ceiling will be a short lift. >> i word when the average person gets engaged again. i wonder how many individuals at home are saying, hon fee, we own some united healthcare. we've been buying it because of obama care and we know everybody is going to be added somehow to be covered. i just don't see that type of interest to -- it's professionals that are trading the market. it's not -- individuals are still not in. >> i agree with you to a point. >> you say something about apple. >> and you only trade at the -- >> in what? >> in facebook. they're kind of a cool kids' stock, so to speak. we had volume, retail customers were definitely trading, though. there are certain names people want to be involved with. for tax reasons, people got out of that last year and many of them put their money back into the market through facebook. it will be interesting to see after a month or a month and a half what happens after that money switches back into apple. we need apple to come out with something exciting. this is the f
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)